A damned serious business: Waterloo 1815, the battle and its books (preview)
On now

A damned serious business: Waterloo 1815, the battle and its books (preview)

Opening on 1 May, ‘A Damned Serious Business’ draws on the rich and varied collections of Cambridge University Library to highlight written records, maps and book arts relating to the Battle of Waterloo and the era in which it played so decisive a part. Political broadsheets, military drill-books, manuscript letters, hand-coloured engravings, printed mementos, early historical accounts and tourist reminiscences, comic and elegiac poems, and a volume from Napoleon’s library in exile on St Helena are brought together to commemorate the most famous battle in European history.

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Ornaments to be engrav’d
On now

Ornaments to be engrav’d

Highlights from a newly-acquired collection of wholly engraved books, from a miniscule Book of Psalms engraved entirely in shorthand to a vast volume of architectural designs from seventeenth-century Venice.

Venue: Entrance Hall cases

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Private Lives of Print: the use and abuse of books 1450-1550

Private Lives of Print: the use and abuse of books 1450-1550

A major exhibition giving insights into the ways early books were decorated, annotated, bound, used and abused by their owners in the first hundred years after the development of the printing press by Johann Gutenberg.

Venue: Milstein Exhibition Centre, and viewable online

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Aldus Manutius: A humanist printer for humanist readers

Aldus Manutius: A humanist printer for humanist readers

The Venetian printer Aldus Manutius produced nearly 120 editions during his twenty-year career from 1495 to 1515. This online exhibition highlights a selection of his works, which are renowned for their purity of proportion and elegance of the founts, and changed the appearance of books for ever.

View online by clicking on the image to the left.

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Literature of the Liberation: the French experience in print 1944–1946

Literature of the Liberation: the French experience in print 1944–1946

An exhibition commemorating the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Paris, showing books published, mainly in France, after the liberation of Paris and before the end of 1946, on the subjects of the Second World War, the German occupation of France, and the eventual liberation by the Allies.

View online by clicking on the image to the left.

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Vivitur ingenio: the 500th anniversary of Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564)

Vivitur ingenio: the 500th anniversary of Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564)

A virtual exhibition marking 500 years since the birth of the ground-breaking anatomist Andreas Vesalius, including images from Cambridge University Library’s unique hand-coloured copy of his Epitome of the seven books on the fabric of the human body.

View online by clicking on the image to the left.

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The death of Captain Cook: mythmaking in print

The death of Captain Cook: mythmaking in print

An exhibition by Julien Domercq, winner of the inaugural Cambridge University Library/History of Art Student Curatorial Competition, tracing the development of the print iconography of the death of Captain Cook.

View online by clicking on the image to the left.

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<em>Flesh wounds</em>: David Holbrook and D-Day

Flesh wounds: David Holbrook and D-Day

On D-Day, 6 June 1944, David Holbrook landed in Normandy as a twenty-one year old tank commander. His 1966 novel Flesh wounds recounted his experiences. This exhibition draws on Holbrook’s literary archive, held in the University Library, to mark the 70th anniversary of the invasion.

View online by clicking on the image to the left.

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‘rhythm and line and necessity’

‘rhythm and line and necessity’

An exhibition tracing the composition of John Riley’s poem Czargrad, from early notebook jottings through manuscript and typescript drafts to the first appearances in print. Click on the image to enter the virtual exhibition.

View online by clicking on the image to the left.

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Tudor colour printing

Tudor colour printing

An exhibition of different ways in which colour was printed in books in Tudor England, resulting from the research of 2012-13 Munby Fellow of Bibliography Dr Elizabeth Upper.

View online by clicking on the image to the left.

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Read all about it!

Read all about it!

An exhibition of nineteenth-century Spanish and English pamphlets and broadsides illustrating wrongdoing, crime and retribution; why did people behave badly, and how did others find out what they had been up to? The display included tales of bandits, pirates, murderesses, poisoners and many more malefactors in highly (and gruesomely) illustrated detail.

View online by clicking on the image to the left.

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Celebrating Sterne’s tercentenary

Celebrating Sterne’s tercentenary

A virtual exhibition celebrating the tercentenary of the birth of Laurence Sterne (24 November 1713), author most famously of The life and opinions of Tristram Shandy, gentleman. His works have inspired numerous imitations and parodies, and illustrations by Hogarth, Cruikshank and many others.

View online by clicking on the image to the left.

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Printing the body

Printing the body

A display of early illustrated medical books from the collection of the distinguished surgeon and scholar Sir Geoffrey Keynes (1887–1982), acquired by Cambridge University Library in 1982.

View online by clicking on the image to the left.

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